1 / 19 ◄   ► ◄  1 / 19  ► pause play enlarge slideshow
Options
2 / 19 ◄   ► ◄  2 / 19  ► pause play enlarge slideshow
Options
3 / 19 ◄   ► ◄  3 / 19  ► pause play enlarge slideshow
Options
4 / 19 ◄   ► ◄  4 / 19  ► pause play enlarge slideshow
Options
5 / 19 ◄   ► ◄  5 / 19  ► pause play enlarge slideshow
Options
6 / 19 ◄   ► ◄  6 / 19  ► pause play enlarge slideshow
Options
7 / 19 ◄   ► ◄  7 / 19  ► pause play enlarge slideshow
Options
8 / 19 ◄   ► ◄  8 / 19  ► pause play enlarge slideshow
Options
9 / 19 ◄   ► ◄  9 / 19  ► pause play enlarge slideshow
Options
10 / 19 ◄   ► ◄  10 / 19  ► pause play enlarge slideshow
Options
11 / 19 ◄   ► ◄  11 / 19  ► pause play enlarge slideshow
Options
12 / 19 ◄   ► ◄  12 / 19  ► pause play enlarge slideshow
Options
13 / 19 ◄   ► ◄  13 / 19  ► pause play enlarge slideshow
Options
14 / 19 ◄   ► ◄  14 / 19  ► pause play enlarge slideshow
Options
15 / 19 ◄   ► ◄  15 / 19  ► pause play enlarge slideshow
Options
16 / 19 ◄   ► ◄  16 / 19  ► pause play enlarge slideshow
Options
17 / 19 ◄   ► ◄  17 / 19  ► pause play enlarge slideshow
Options
18 / 19 ◄   ► ◄  18 / 19  ► pause play enlarge slideshow
Options
19 / 19 ◄   ► ◄  19 / 19  ► pause play enlarge slideshow
Options

Refugees

Every year, thousands of migrants attempt to cross the Mediterranean Sea from Libya to Sicily in rubber dinghies.
They come mainly from Syria, Iraq and Eritrea, leaving everything behind. With more than 100,000 migrants having reached Italian waters since January 2014, we are witnessing an unprecedented surge of migration.
Between November 2013 and 1 November 2014 the Italian humanitarian mission Mare Nostrum, set up after the death of 360 migrants near the coast of Lampedusa, made it possible to save an estimated 70,000 lives in less than a year at a monthly cost of 9 million to the Italian government.
Since 1 November Mare Nostrum has been largely replaced by Operation Triton, run by the EU border agency Frontex. The funds made available to Triton and its geographical reach are much more limited than Mare Nostrum's budget and geographical reach. Discussions are ongoing between the Italian government and the EU agency Forex about Triton complementing or replacing Mare Nostrum. For thousands of men, women and children this vacuum and change means an increased risk of dying during crossings, which are now described as death crossings.
When arriving in Catania, many are automatically picked up and sent to overcrowded 'reception centres' in Mineo or Messina in Sicily, some stay for a while in a spare accommodation at the local mosque, while others simply escape from the centres and end up living on the street.

loading